From Space suit to satellite

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Summary: Have you ever heard of the Suitsat? As clear as it sounds, a satellite that is a suit. More specifically, one spacesuit! This is a result of some trials occurred in 2006, when the Orlan MK spacesuit was applied for other kind of tests and activities rather than just the original purpose; because the suit was already damaged and couldn’t keep being used as regularly, so this was done with the idea of finding other uses for space trash rather than just dispose of them as regularly. From Space

Have you ever heard of the Suitsat?

As clear as it sounds, a satellite that is a suit. More specifically, one spacesuit! This is a result of some trials occurred in 2006, when the Orlan MK spacesuit was applied for other kind of tests and activities rather than just the original purpose; because the suit was already damaged and couldn’t keep being used as regularly, so this was done with the idea of finding other uses for space trash rather than just dispose of them as regularly.

From Space suit to satellite 1

The common way to eliminate this trash is to burn them by launching it to the earth’s atmosphere, where disintegration is almost imminent, including space suits too of course. It is known that the suits do not have a long life in front of them, and even less such a model as the Russian Orlan suit.

Amy Shira Teitel was one of the minds behind that cool idea of transforming a space trash into a satellite, according to her a closed group of professionals at the International Space Station (off Rusia) figured an alternative outcome for the item, working alongside radio specialists they managed to give it a real purpose rather than just wander at space or burn in collision with the planet’s atmosphere.

Recycling is the way

The project had a series of process core to the goal which consisted basically in the installation of transmitters and radio equipment, which reproduced recorded voice messages in several languages from Spanish to Japanese, and also captures very detailed data of environment, sounds, and temperature.

Of course the Suitsat-1 was just that, a project that was resurrected for the collective desire of surpassing the lengths of the field, and do a different kind of recycling, expanding the concept of possibility. Beyond that, there wasn’t too much left to do with the satellite, nevertheless on 2007 the second Orlan spacesuit was conceived years later at 2010.

From Space suit to satellite

ARISSat-1 (previously known as SuitSat-2), was the follow up to this experimental idea that did more than just prove a point, and had several improvements regarding its predecessor. Starting with the battery, which in SuitSat-1 were electrical and it offered a short period life of service and improved the speed of its degeneration; this time around it works with solar panels which were determined to last to an extent of six months.

The ARISSat-1 was launched from the ISS in august 2011 and came back around January in 2012, with a number of 150 days out there in orbit. It had FM telemetry and recorded voices and imagery, a set of U/v transponder (linear) and software of radio capacity in long distance range.

The whole deal was to integrate students with their own experiments and built them into the satellite, and it proved twice that it was a great way to not only encourage academic community but the science of spacecraft construction, be inventive is key to keep moving forward, and that goes along with the concept of recycling which is pretty much required for a cleaner storyline in our present earth.

Tags: News - Space

Jefferson Da
2 years, 8 months ago
"Trying to change the world!"

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2 years, 7 months ago

DougUP29  2 comments

Whoops! Fucked that up straight off the bat!!!


2 years, 7 months ago

DougUP29  2 comments

Looking for good mate lost touch with, Chrisso from Elsternwick,wikr was Stopdroproll


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